Transnational Memory and Identity - Members

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Jocelyn Martin is Assistant Professor at Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines, where she initiated courses on Literature, Memory and Trauma Studies. She is also Managing Editor of Kritika Kultura, a Thomson-Reuter-indexed journal. After obtaining her PhD in Langues et lettres from the Université Libre de Bruxelles in 2010, she has published book chapters in the volumes Re/membering Place (Peter Lang, 2013) and Aboriginal Australians and other ‘Others’ (Les Indes savantes, 2014). Her article, “Manilaner’s Holocaust Meets Manileños’ Colonisation: Cross-Traumatic Affiliations and Postcolonial Considerations in Trauma Studies”, published in 2015, is included in the special issue of Humanities on Decolonizing Trauma Studies. Belgian-Filipina, she speaks five languages.
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website: https://ateneo.academia.edu/jocelynmartin

Ljiljana Radonić is a post-doctoral researcher at the Institute of Culture Studies and Theatre History of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and a lecturer on 'European memory conflicts since 1989' at the University of Vienna. Her post-doctoral project explores the ‘World War II in Post-Communist Memorial Museums’ (APART fellowship). She was a visiting professor at the University of Giessen in Germany in 2015. Her doctoral dissertation entitled War on Memory. Croatian Politics of the Past between Revisionism and European Standards was published in 2010 (in German, Campus Publishing).
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website: http://homepage.univie.ac.at/ljiljana.radonic

Kevin Hearty graduated with an LLB in Law with Government from the University of Ulster in 2008. He returned to full time post-graduate education in 2010 completing an LLM in Human Rights Law and Transitional Justice at the Transitional Justice Institute, University of Ulster. His LLM thesis was awarded the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission Prize for best dissertation at the TJI, and forms the basis of two subsequent academic publications. Kevin progressed to PhD level at the TJI in 2011 and successfully completed his thesis in November 2014 achieving a straight pass. He was appointed Research Fellow at Warwick in February 2015. With an emerging academic profile in interdisciplinary empirical socio-legal research his main research interests lie in Transitional Justice, Human Rights, Political Violence, Memory Politics and Policing. To date he has published research on state violence in Northern Ireland, the Belfast Flag protests and the 'dealing with the past' debate in Northern Ireland.
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Alena Pfoser is Lecturer in Communication and Media Studies at Loughborough University. Her research interests cover memory studies, border studies, nationalism and heritage tourism with a particular focus on Central and Eastern Europe. She is currently working on a monograph looking at the role of memory in the making of the EU external border, based on ethnographic fieldwork in the Russian-Estonian borderland. She is a member of Loughborough University's Memory Studies Research Group.
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website: http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/socialsciences/staff/academicandresearch/pfoser-alena.html

Kathryn Allen is a PhD Candidate in Anthropology at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo. As an undergraduate student at SUNY Geneseo, she majored in International Relations with a concentration in European Systems. Her focus was almost completely on Eastern Europe, a focus that has significantly influenced her graduate work. Now an archaeologist, she specializes in bioarchaeology, a sub-field in anthropology that analyzes human skeletal remains from archaeological contexts. She works in Eastern Europe, predominately Romania and is currently learning both Romanian and Russian. Her current research is on the formation of the Muslim identity and ethnicity during the Ottoman era in Southeastern Europe. She is interested in how the past impacts modern day issues and perceptions, particularly issues of ethnic conflict and group identity.
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Nisan Alıcı is a current MA student in both Human Rights in Ankara University and International Conflict and Security at the Brussels School of International Studies. After having completed his bachelor’s degree in Political Science and International Relations in Boğaziçi University, he started to work as a deputy advisor in Grand National Assembly of Turkey for a deputy of Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP). During his work in HDP he gained experience on conflict and resolution, which he combined with his academic studies. He is now particularly interested in peace studies, memory studies, dealing with the past, transnational justice especially in Turkey, Balkans, Middle East and South Africa. He also works as a Program Coordinator for Peace, Reconciliation and Social Memory in DEMOS Research Center (its link is below). 
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website: http://en.demos.org.tr/

 
Eleni Bastéa is Regents’ Professor of Architecture and director of the International Studies Institute at the University of New Mexico, US. Her books include The Creation of Modern Athens: Planning the Myth (Cambridge University Press, 2000), Memory and Architecture (University of New Mexico Press, 2004), and Venice without Gondolas, poems, (Finishing Line Press, 2013)
She has appeared in the English-language documentaries Smyrna: The destruction of a cosmopolitan city, 1900-1922 and From Both Sides of the Aegean, (both directed by Maria Iliou, Proteus production, 2012). Bastéa drew from her own archival research on Smyrna/Izmir and Cappadocia, as well as family stories and oral-history interviews she conducted over the years.
Her current project is provisionally titled "Thessaloniki: Topographies of history, memory, and desire."
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website: www.elenibastea.com


Cristina Blanco Sío-López (PhD in History and Civilization at the EUI-Florence, 2008) works as Established Researcher (R3) in European and Global Studies, Project Manager and Principal Investigator. She is Associate Researcher at the Institute of Contemporary History (IHC) of the New University of Lisbon, EUI Ambassador, Researcher at the Royal Elcano Institute and Guest Lecturer of the MA programmes in European and International Studies at the Universities of Perugia, Siegen and Bologna. She previously worked as Research Project Director and PI at the Luxembourg Ministry of Research; as Scientific Coordinator for the Consortium for Comparative Research on Regional Integration and Social Cohesion (RISC); at the DG Enlargement of the European Commission in Brussels and at the US Congress in Washington, D.C. She also worked as Research and Academic Associate at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (RSCAS) in Florence, as Researcher for the EP research project '50 Years of History of the European Parliament' and taught European Studies at the Universities of Luxembourg, Salamanca, UCM, UNL, Siena, Jagiellonian of Krakow and Georgetown. She was also a Visiting Researcher at the University of Heidelberg, the Freie Universität Berlin, the George Washington University, the Berliner Kolleg für Vergleichende Geschichte Europas (BKVGE) and completed the 'Space Exploration Studies and Astronaut Training Programme' at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (Huntsville, AL, US). Main research areas: European Studies; History of European Integration; EU Enlargement & International Relations; Comparative Regional Integration; Oral History; Critical Discourse Analysis & Digital Humanities, all from an interdisciplinary, comparative and global perspective.
Other affiliations:
• EUI-RSCAS Global Governance Programme Network
• Consortium for Comparative Research on Regional Integration and Social Cohesion (RISC)
• Research Network 1989
• Research Network on Latin American Integration (REDILA)
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website: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Cristina_Blanco_Sio-Lopez


Dovilė Budrytė is currently a Professor of Political Science at Georgia Gwinnett College in the United States. Her areas of interest include historical memory, gender studies and identity issues. Her publications include articles about the Baltic states and three books, most recently Memory and Trauma in International Relations: Theories, Cases and Debates(co-editor with Erica Resende, Routledge, 2013). In 2014/15, she was the recipient of the University System of Georgia Excellence in Teaching Award.
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website: http://www.ggc.edu/about-ggc/directory/dovile-budryte

Elisabeth Bunselmeyer is a PhD student in political science at the GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies in Hamburg. She writes her dissertation on the impact of transitional justice on social cohesion in postwar societies using the example of the Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Elisabeth holds a M.A. in Peace and Conflict Research from the University of Marburg. Her research interests include the development of postwar societies, memory politics and identity construction. 
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website: http://www.giga-hamburg.de/en/team/bunselmeyer


Ulrike Capdepón (Ph.D in Political Sciences, University of Hamburg 2011) is currently a DAAD Postdoctoral Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of Human Rights (ISHR) and an Associate Researcher at the Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) of the German Institute of Global and Area Studies. She has been a Marie Curie-Fellow at the Center for Human Science and Humanities (CCHS) of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) in Madrid where she worked in a project about the impact of mass grave exhumations from the Spanish Civil War, and a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Konstanz in the European Research Council Project “Narratives of Terror and Disappearance”. Her research interests include memory studies, human rights and transitional justice processes in Latin America and Spain, as well as national and international prosecutions of human rights crimes and enforced disappearance. She is a member of the Dialogues on Historical Justice and Memory network (New York), and a founding member of Memorias en Red (Madrid).
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webpage: https://www.giga-hamburg.de/en/team/capdepón


Adam Chapman’s research focuses on the representation of the past in digital games, i.e. historical videogames.  With a background in history (BA Hons) and cultural history (MA) he then obtained a PhD in media, culture and society in 2013 and is now a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Gothenburg.  His forthcoming book Digital Games as History (Routledge) offers an analytical approach to digital historical games, as well as exploring exactly how games represent the past and the offers of access to historical practice that they make.  
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website: https://gu-se.academia.edu/AdamChapman 

Laura B. Cohen is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Rutgers University’s Division of Global Affairs (USA). Her research focuses on sites of atrocity and her broader areas of scholarly inquiry include memory studies, memorialization, genocide prevention, human rights, and transitional justice. She has conducted extensive fieldwork across Bosnia i Herzegovina since 2010 as well as at specific sites of atrocity in Germany, Poland, and Cambodia. Laura holds a Master of Science in Global Affairs from New York University (USA) as well as a Master of Arts in Media Studies from the New School for Social Research.
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website: http://dga.rutgers.edu/index.php/students/member/cohen-laura/


Alon Confino is a professor of history at the University of Virginia and at Ben-Gurion University in Israel. He has worked over the years on modern German and European history, memory, nationhood, cultural history, and the Holocaust. His recent book is A World Without Jews: The Nazi Imagination from Persecution to Genocide (Yale University Press, 2014). He is now working on a global history of forced migrations in the 1940s in Central and Eastern Europe, India/Pakistan, and Palestine/Israel. His focus is a book project on the 1948 war in Palestine.
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website: http://history.virginia.edu/user/18

Paula Craft-Pegg holds a Masters of Architecture from Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Her teaching and research reflect her experience and interest in collaborative and cross-discipline design. Her design work, research, and studios explore the inseparable relationship between landscape and architecture, using cultural, historical, and topographic concepts to design and support ecologically and economically sustainable places. She teaches professional practice as an integrated design tool - enabling, supporting, and creating successful design projects through practice.
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website: www.craftpegg.com


Lea David's work examines how a contested past in Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia Herzegovina, Israel and Palestine is managed through the clashes of the local and the global memory cultures. Her main research interests cover the Holocaust/Genocide nexus; the interconnectedness of nationalism, human rights and memory politics; and memorialization projects, conflict and ethnicity. She is currently a Fulbright-Rabin postdoctoral fellow at the Anthropology Department, Pittsburgh University. She has lectured at various Israeli Universities and Colleges.
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website: https://haifa.academia.edu/LeaDavid

Jennifer M. Dixon is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Villanova University. She holds a PhD in political science from UC Berkeley, and was previously a Research Fellow in the International Security Program at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Her research focuses on the politics of memory, genocide and mass killing, and the diffusion and impact of international norms. She is currently completing a book manuscript, titled Changing the State’s Story: The Politics of Dark Pasts in Turkey and Japan, which investigates the sources of change and continuity in states’ narratives of past atrocities, focusing on Turkey’s narrative of the Armenian Genocide and Japan’s narrative of the Nanjing Massacre.  
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website: https://sites.google.com/site/jennifermargaretdixon


Vincent Druliolle is Assistant Professor in Politics in the Department of Social Sciences at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. In 2014-2015 he was Santander Visiting Fellow in the European Studies Centre, St Antony's College, University of Oxford. His work focuses on 1) the relationship between the politics of memory, transitional justice and democracy and 2) the politics of victimhood. He has published various articles about these issues in Argentina and Spain in journals such as Social and Legal Studies, The Journal of Human Rights and the International Journal of Transitional Justice. He is also the co-editor, with Francesca Lessa, of The Memory of State Terrorism in the Southern Cone Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).
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Website: http://uc3m.academia.edu/VincentDruliolle 


Ben Duke is a PhD Candidate at Keele University, UK. His research interests include Bourdieu’s ‘cultural reproduction’ theory, applied in contemporary Higher Education. He has an interest in educative reflective practices, including criticality, which has a focus upon pedagogy, how we learn, coupled with reflecting upon education experiences. His PhD is specifically about experiential learning via student placements in higher education.
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website: https://keele.academia.edu/BenDuke

Jelena Dureinovic is a doctoral candidate at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture and the Department for Eastern European History at Justus Liebig University in Giessen, Germany. She received her MA degree in Nationalism Studies from the Central European University in Budapest and holds a BA degree from the University of Novi Sad, Serbia. Her current work is centered on the official politics of memory on the Second World War in contemporary Serbia, examining the changes in the interpretation of the Yugoslav Army in the Homeland. Her research interests include politics of memory, dealing with the past, and post-socialist transformations.
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website: https://uni-giessen.academia.edu/JelenaDureinovic


Elsa Duval is a doctoral student of the Johannes Gutenberg University and a researcher in the project “Knowledge of the World – Heritage of Mankind” at the Leibniz Institute for European History, Mainz. Her advisor is Prof. Dr. Johannes Paulmann. Her current work focuses on the Aachen Cathedral World Heritage Site as well as FRG heritage and history politics in the 1970s and 1980s. More generally, she is interested in 20th century german history, international organizations, heritage conservation, politics of history and diplomacy of culture.
She has a Franco-German Masters in medieval history from the Universities Paris 7 and Bielefeld and a Bachelor in archeology from the University Paris 4. She was a visiting fellow at Columbia University in history in 2011-2012.
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Rosanna Farbøl is a doctoral candidate in the history department at Aarhus University. Her principal research interests are memory studies and politics of memory, particularly political uses of contemporary history. She is currently doing her PhD thesis on the role of the Cold War in Danish historical culture, examining the processes of dealing with a controversial Cold War past; how the Cold War is understood and made sense of, interpreted, represented, narrated and used by different actors in Danish public and political debate. Rosanna is Danish MC substitute in the COST action In Search for Transcultural Memory in Europe (ISTME) as well as member of a number of other memory networks including the Danish Network for Cultural Memory Studies and the network Norms and Narratives.
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website: http://au.dk/hisrf@hum


Patrick Finney is a Reader in the Department of International Politics, Aberystwyth University, UK. His research interests range widely across twentieth century international history and the history of collective memory. His last monograph offered a reading of the historiography of the origins of the Second World War as a discourse of collective memory; he is completing a book on the global collective memory of that conflict since the end of the Cold War for OUP.
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website: https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/interpol/staff/academic/pbf/

Sybille Frank, Prof. Dr., received her PhD from the Technical University Darmstadt in 2008. She is currently Junior Professor for Urban and Regional Sociology at the Technical University Berlin. Her work focuses on tourism and heritage studies, on comparative city research, and on the sociology of space and place. Her German book on the international heritage industry at Berlin’s Checkpoint Charlie won the prize “Humanities International” in 2012. It will be published in English under the title Wall Memorials and Heritage (Routledge) in 2016.
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website: http://www.srs.tu-berlin.de/menue/mitarbeiterinnen/prof_dr_sybille_frank/parameter/en/

Emilio J. Gallardo-Saborido's research interests are focused on the contemporary cultural identity of Southern Spain. Furthermore, he researches the literature and sociology of culture of contemporary Latin America. Currently, he is a member of the European research project "In search of transcultural memory in Europe" (COST, European Cooperation in Science and Technology).
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website: http://investigacion.us.es/sisius/sis_showpub.php?idpers=18939

Diana Georgescu received her PhD in History at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign in 2015 and is currently an Assistant Professor in Transnational/Comparative Southeast European Studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College London. She specializes in modern European history, Cold War studies, the transnational history of childhood and youth, memory studies and oral history, gender history, and comparative nationalism. She is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively entitled “Ceaușescu’s Children:” The Making and Unmaking of Romania’s Last Socialist Generation (1965-2010). She has published articles on post-socialist memory regimes, the shifting intersections of national and transnational identities in modern Europe, and gendered representations of national and European citizenship. 
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Carol Gluck, Columbia University, is a historian of modern Japan who studies and writes about World War II in history and memory, the politics of memory in East Asia, and the relationship between history and memory. She is co-director, with Denis Peschanski, of a multiyear Franco-American project on The Politics of Memory in Global Context, which combines scholars of public memory, neuroscientists and pyschologists on individual memory, and curators of historical/memorial museums that present the past in public.
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Yulia A. Griber, doctor of Cultural Studies, professor at the Department of Social Studies at Smolensk State University. Graduated from Smolensk State University with a degree in «Philology», the University of Hagen (Germany) with a degree in «Social and Cultural Studies». The Author of more than 120 publications in Russian, English, German, Ukrainian, Belorussian, including more than 20 publications at foreign universities and 8 monographs, such as «Episteme of Color in Smolensk Architecture and Painting» (Smolensk: Madgenta, 2008), «Methods of Studying and Designing of Urban Color Space» (Smolensk: Publishing Office of Smolensk State University, 2011), «Color Representation of Social Space of a European City» (Moscow: Soglasie, 2013), «The Town Planning Painting and Kazimir Malevitch» (Moscow: Soglasie, 2014). Conducts research in philosophy of culture, epistemology of art, sociology of architecture, urban color. Y.A. Griber’s research is supported by numerous grants of Russian and foreign scientific foundations, such as the Foundation of the President of the Russian Federation, Russian Foundation for Humanities, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), W. Fulbright Foundation, the Malevich Society Foundation.
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Jill Grinager is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Justus-Liebig University (JLU) in Giessen, Germany and Coordinator of Curriculum and Evaluations at the Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (GCSC) at JLU. Her research examines child welfare in the GDR focusing specifically on institutions for raising youth outside of the traditional family home. Jill Grinager is a former Fulbright Scholar. She completed her BA at American University in International Studies and her MA at Georgetown University in German and European Studies. In addition to her academic accomplishments, Jill Grinager has also worked in academic management at American University.
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Johannes Grow received both his B.A in International Studies (Double major in IS and German) and his MPIA (Master's in Public and International Affairs) (2012-2014) from Virginia Tech. He is currently a Ph.D student in the Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought (ASPECT) program at Virginia Tech. His interests lie at the intersection of modern political and social theory, EU and European studies, international relations theory, critical security studies, critical geopolitics, and cultural studies. He also is an instructor in the Department of History at Virginia Tech. 
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website: http://www.aspect.vt.edu/people/grow-bio.html

Rabia Harmansah received her Ph.D. in Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh in 2014 and is currently teaching at Bilkent University. She specializes in cultural anthropology, memory studies, cultural heritage and material culture, nationalism, ethnicity and ethnic conflict, anthropology of religion, with an emphasis on Cyprus, Turkey, the Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Her doctoral research examines the practices of memory-making and forgetting at religious and historical sites in the Greek and Turkish parts of Cyprus after the ethnic conflict and partition in 1974.
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Andrea Hepworth is a Lecturer in the Spanish and Latin American Studies Programme at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. Her research focuses on political memory and the interplay between national identity and collective memory, in particular the comparative analysis of contemporary Spanish and German memory culture, and is interdisciplinary in nature. Further research interests include the intergenerational transmission of traumatic memories, Holocaust studies and the historical memory movement in contemporary Spain. Her recent research has expanded into the field of transcultural and transnational memory, going beyond the nationally oriented memory studies to investigate the transcultural dynamics of memory in Europe and beyond. She is a member country observer of the In Search for Transcultural Memory in Europe (ISTME) network, a member of the Dialogues on Historical Justice and Memory network, and a member of the National Oral History Association of New Zealand (NOHANZ).
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website: http://www.victoria.ac.nz/slc/about/staff/andrea-hepworth

Isabelle Hesse is a lecturer in English at the University of Sydney. Prior to that, she was a research associate and a postdoctoral research fellowship at the University of York, UK, where she also completed her PhD in contemporary world literature. Her research interests include the cultural memory of the Holocaust and colonialism in Germany and the UK; the Holocaust, Israel, and Palestine as narrative tropes in contemporary culture; postcolonial studies; and Israeli and Palestinian literature and film. Her first book The Politics of Jewishness in Contemporary World Literature was published with Bloomsbury in 2016 and her work has also been published in Textual Practice and Postcolonial Text.
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website: http://sydney.edu.au/arts/english/staff/profiles/isabelle.hesse.php 

Alma Jeftić received her B.A. in Psychology from the University of Sarajevo and M.A. in State Management and Humanitarian Affairs from the University of Sarajevo, University of Belgrade and La Sapienza University of Rome. She is Ph.D. candidate in Psychology at the University of Belgrade. She was a Senior Visiting Researcher at the School of Psychology, University of Sussex (February 2015), and a Senior Assistant at the Psychology Program, International University of Sarajevo (2010-present). Her interests include collective memory and emotions. 
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website: http://psy.ius.edu.ba/alma-jeftic 

Sara Jones is a Senior Research Fellow/Lecturer in the Institute for German Studies (IGS) at the University of Birmingham (UK). Her research has focused particularly on memory of the GDR in a comparative context. She is currently working on a project analysing cross-border collaboration between European 'memory entrepreneurs.' She was project lead for the IGS's DAAD-funded network Worldviews: The German Past and the Contemporary World and is convenor for the History and Remembrance panel of the Association of German Studies in Great Britain and Ireland.
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website: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/lcahm/departments/languages/sections/german/staff/profile.aspx?ReferenceId=21908

Steffi de Jong is a post-doctoral researcher at the Institute for Contemporary History at the University of Cologne. Her research interests include museum studies, cultural memory studies, sound studies, digital history and public history. She is currently working on a project on the use of sound in memorial museums. She obtained her Phd from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in December 2012 with the thesis Musealising the Witness. Video Testimonies in Holocaust and Second World War Museums. She has published internationally on the figure of the witness and the museal representation of history. She is a member of  ICOM, ICMEMO, and COMCOL.
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website: http://neuere-geschichte.phil-fak.uni-koeln.de/948.html?&L=0

Wolfram Kaiser is Professor at the University of Portsmouth, UK, and Visiting Professor at the College of Europe. He has held visiting professor/fellow positions at the FU Berlin, the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study and a number of other institutions. His research interests include global history (world exhibitions), the transnational history of Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth century (including anti-clericalism, European integration, political party cooperation etc.) and narratives and the politics of memory in Europe, esp. in European institutions and in museums. He has published inter alia (with J. Schot), Writing the Rules for Europe. Experts, Cartels, International Organizations (2014), (with S. Krankenhagen and K. Poehls), Exhibiting Europe in Museums. Transnational Networks, Collections, Narratives, and Representations (2014), Christian Democracy and the Origins of European Union (2007).
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website: http://www.port.ac.uk/centre-for-european-and-international-studies-research/members/professor-wolfram-kaiser.html

Vicky Karaiskou is Assistant Professor at the Open University of Cyprus, BA Program “Studies in Hellenic Culture” and Academic Coordinator of the MA Program "Cultural Policy and Development." Her research focuses on the interactions between artworks and social milieu. Particular issues of research are the human figure and public space; cultural and national identities; cultural memory; commemoration; art and power; public sculpture; contemporary Greek art. Her last book Uses and abuses of culture. Greece 1974-2010 is pending publication by Cambridge Scholars Publishing (expected in December 2015). She has recently concluded the research program "Cyprus: land of memories, places of art", were she explores public sculpture in Cyprus, and its role in the shaping of national and cultural identities. The official website of the project is the http://publicart.ouc.ac.cy.  
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website: http://www.ouc.ac.cy/web/vkaraiskou


Lina Klymenko is a postdoctoral researcher at the Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland. She holds a Ph.D. degree in Political Science from the University of Vienna, Austria. Her research interests include politics of memory and national identity, political culture and democratization in post-Soviet countries, and teaching and learning politics. Her research has been published in Problems of Post-CommunismSoviet and Post-Soviet Review, Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education, Österreichische Zeitschrift für Politikwissenschaft, and National Identities.
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website: http://www2.uef.fi/en/ktl/lina_klymenko

Oxana Karnaukhova is an Associate Professor at the Institute of History and International Relations, Southern Federal University (Russia). She holds a Ph.D. in Cultural Studies from the 
Southern Federal University and is a former Executive Director of the Centre of European Union in the South West Russia (2011-2014). Her research concerns exploitation of cultural approach to socio-economic development of multicultural agglomerations and investigation of communicative strategies within cooperation accounts. Publication list includes articles on cultural indoctrination in economic development, intercultural communications in transnational corporations, communicative strategies, and entrepreneurship performance, multicultural policies and practices in the EU and Eurasian states.
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Christian Karner is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Nottingham. His research and publications center on the negotiation of local, ethnic, religious, and national identities, as well as the role of memory politics in those negotiations, in the context of contemporary globalizing pressures. His central area of specialism is Austria. His books include Writing History, Constructing Religion (2005, coedited with James Crossley), Ethnicity and Everyday Life (2007), Negotiating National Identities (2011), The Use and Abuse of Memory: Interpreting World War II in Contemporary European Politics (2013, co-edited with Bram Mertens), and most recently The Commonalities of Global Crises: Markets, Communities and Nostalgia (2016, co-edited with Bernhard Weicht).
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website: https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/sociology/people/christian.karner

Susanne C. Knittel is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. She holds a Ph.D. in Italian and Comparative Literature from Columbia University, New York. In her research, she explores questions of memory, commemoration, and cultural amnesia. She is particularly interested in the interaction of literature and other cultural media as vehicles of both majority and minority memory at the local, national, and transnational level. Her monograph The Historical Uncanny: Disability, Ethnicity, and the Politics of Holocaust Memory (Fordham UP, 2015) is a comparative study of German and Italian postwar memory culture. Her current research focuses on the figure of the perpetrator in post-communist Romania and post-reunification Germany. She is a member of NITMES (Network in Transnational Memory Studies) and founding member of The Perpetrator Studies Network.
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website: http://www.uu.nl/medewerkers/SCKnittel/0


Egge Kulbock-Lattik’s dissertation - The Historical Formation and Development of Estonian Cultural Policy: Tracing the Development of Estonian Community Houses (Rahvamaja) - is based on peer-reviewed articles and belongs to the fields of historical sociology and cultural policy research. Her approach implies an historical-sociological examination of Estonian cultural and societal transformations, including the general overview of the political system that affects and activates mutual influences between the capitalist market, civil society and nation state – which all, as central phenomena and institutional spheres are incarnations, as well as driving forces, of modernization (similar in Baltic states) In order to exemplify interactions between civil society and the modern state during different political eras of Estonian history, a case study on the historical emergence and development of Estonian community houses (rahvamaja) has been chosen. With the example of community houses, the historical roots, formation, aims, and development of Estonian cultural policy can be observed. As a whole, the roots and historical development of Estonian cultural policy under the different political systems has been framed and theorized with the concept of different modernities: the development of the nation-state with the rise of liberal democracy and industrial capitalism within ‘Western’ modernity (1918-30s), and Soviet socialist state practices within the Communist project of Modernity (1940-1991).
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Ferenc Laczó is interested in the history and memory of Europe in the twentieth century and has a special focus on Central and Eastern Europe. He received his PhD from the Central European University (2010), worked as a researcher at the Imre Kertész Kolleg Jena (2010-15), and currently lectures in European history at Maastricht University. He is working on a project preliminarily titled The Making and Unmaking of the Liberal Consensus. Hungary from Late Communism to the European Union.
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website: https://unimaas.academia.edu/FerencLacz%C3%B3

Sigrun Lehnert specializes in cinema newsreels, documentary film, early television, and is interested in memory research. She majored in Media Management and since 2009, she has worked as a scientific assistant in Journalism. She received her PhD in 2012 at the University of Hamburg with her project about newsreels and television news in the 1950s. Her book Wochenschau und Tagesschau in den 1950er Jahren compares the institutional development of newsreel productions and television and the covering of historical incidents in Germany.
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Linda Levitt received her PhD in Communication from the University of South Florida and teaches at Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas. Her research focuses at the intersection of cultural memory and media studies, looking at the influence of media in shaping collective memory of people and events. She has published and presented research on cemetery tourism, dark tourism practices in Los Angeles, and a number of sites of memory around the United States, including the September 11 memorial and museum.
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Daniel Levy is Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook University in New York. He has long been involved in collective memory studies. As a political sociologist he is interested in the development of a theoretical framework in the emerging field of cosmopolitan studies. He is co-founder of the Columbia University Seminar on History, Redress and Reconciliation. He also co-founded the Memory Studies Bank, a bibliographic repository for memory scholars.

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website: http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/sociology/people/faculty/levy.html

Borislava Manojlovic, PhD, is a researcher and professor at the School of Diplomacy and International Relations, Seton Hall University in the US. She is an expert in conflict analysis and resolution, dealing with the past, reconciliation, peacemaking and atrocities prevention. She worked on minorities and reconciliation related issues with the United Nations and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe in both Croatia and Kosovo for more than seven years. Her consulting services include conflict resolution training and small business coaching, online courses and seminars, program development, evaluation and data analysis. She is also affiliated with the Historical Dialogues, Justice, and Memory Network, the International Association of Genocide Scholars, and the Alliance for Peacebuilding.
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website: http://borislavamanojlovic.com/

Sabine Marschall holds a PhD in History of Art from the Eberhardt-Karls University in Tübingen and is currently employed as Associate Professor in Cultural and Heritage Tourism at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Her research interests include issues of cultural heritage and collective memory, commemoration, memorialization, monuments and heritage tourism. Her book Landscape of Memory was published by Brill in 2010. She is currently working on an edited collection entitled Tourism and Memories of Home (Channel View).
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website:
 http://za.linkedin.com/in/marschalls 

Nela Milic is an artist and an academic working in media and arts, particularly in merging text and image, creating installations, archives and publications. She is interested in the intersection of time and space, which brought her to many multi-media and arts projects where she dealt with narrative, digital archives, city and participation. She developed a project Balkanising Taxonomy (www.goldsmiths.ac.uk/balkanising-taxonomy) at Goldsmiths University where she researched the city as a site of spectacle and the culture of protest. Currently, she is teaching at Middlesex University’s Media and Performing Arts school and at Goldsmiths MA Participatory and Community Arts.
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Paul Miller teaches modern European history at McDaniel College (USA). He has written on genocide memory in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and currently works on the memory of the Sarajevo assassination. His recent publications include “Yugoslav Eulogies: The Footprints of Gavrilo Princip” (The Carl Beck Papers in Russian and East European Studies, 2014); “Forgetting Franz Ferdinand: The Archduke in Austrian Memory” (Austrian History Yearbook, 2015); and The Sandwich That Sabotaged Civilisation, in Oxford University’s podcast series First World War: New Perspectives.
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website: http://www.mcdaniel.edu/undergraduate/the-mcdaniel-plan/departments/history


Ana Milošević is a joint PhD candidate at the University of Leuven in Belgium and the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands. Her research interests cover collective memories, identities and European integration of the post-conflict societies with a special focus on coming to terms with the past. Currently, she is collaborating with the European Observatory on memories, at University of Barcelona in Spain on topics related to European memory, transnational memory activism and the politics of memory in the Western Balkans. 
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Nicolas Moll holds a PhD in Contemporary History from the University of Freiburg i. Br. and is currently working in Sarajevo as a freelance historian and intercultural trainer. His research interests include processes of dealing with the past and of reconciliation in post-conflict areas, especially in the post-Yugoslav space since the 1990s, and in Western Europe after 1945. He is also coordinator of Memory Lab – Trans-European Exchange Platform on History and Remembrance which is gathering practitioners in the field of dealing with the past from the successor-states of Yugoslavia and from Western Europe.
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website: http://www.nicolasmoll.eu/

Seamus Montgomery is a DPhil candidate in the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology (ISCA) and the Centre on Migration, Policy, and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford and a Visiting Researcher at the Institute for European Studies-VUB. He holds an MA in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago and BAs in English, Anthropology, and the Comparative History of Ideas from the University of Washington. He has held teaching positions in American Literature and in 2012-2013 conducted research for the University of Chicago’s Urban Health Initiative on Chicago’s South Side. His research interests include Europeanization, modernity, identity, bureaucracy nationalism, migration, the history of anthropology, and theories of culture in the social sciences. His current research examines the varieties of institutional life within the European Commission and the life histories, identities, and belongings of those who work within it. Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork among EU civil servants in Brussels, it seeks to shed light upon identity formation and understandings of culture and nationality within the institution, as well as how the interplay between its political and administrative dimensions are negotiated on a daily basis. How do EU officials understand their roles? What can be said of a prevailing institutional ethos? How does European-ness manifest itself in the lives of civil servants at work and at home?
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Steven Nam is a Lecturer in Law at UC Davis School of Law who primarily teaches courses on transitional justice and the politics of memory, with a particular interest in the Asia-Pacific.  He also serves as a researcher for the Columbia Global Policy Initiative at Columbia University.  A graduate of Yale College and Columbia University (J.D., M.A. Political Science), he previously worked as an antitrust attorney at Jones Day and was a Visiting Fellow at Columbia Business School.
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Laure Neumayer holds a PhD in Political Science from Sciences Po Paris. She is Assistant Professor of Political Science at University Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne and Researcher at CESSP laboratory (CNRS). From 2013-2018, she is a Junior Fellow at the Institut Universitaire de France. Her current research focuses on memory-related policies and politics in the European Union and the Council of Europe. Her most recent publications include History, memory and politics in Central and Eastern Europe (co-editor with Georges Mink, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and "Integrating the Central European Past into a Common Narrative: the mobilizations around the ‘crimes of Communism’ in the European Parliament”, Journal of Contemporary European Studies, 23(3), 2015.
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Website : http://cessp.cnrs.fr/spip.php?rubrique113&lang=fr


Esra Ozyurek is an Associate Professor and Chair for Contemporary Turkish Studies at the European Institute, London School of Economics. She received her PhD in Anthropology from the University of Michigan. She is the author of Nostalgia for the Modern: State Secularism and Everyday Politics in Turkey (Duke University Press) and Being German, Becoming Muslim: Race, Religion, and Conversion in the New Europe (Princeton University Press). Currently she is working on Holocaust memory and minorities in Germany and Turkey.
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website: http://www.lse.ac.uk/europeanInstitute/staff/academicStaff/ozyurek/Dr-Esra-Ozyurek.aspx

Bojan Perovic is a PhD researcher at the University of Hamburg, Faculty of Law. He recieved his BA in Law from the University of Belgrade and obtained his Master degree in International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights from the University of Belgrade, Faculty of Political Sciences. Prior to joining University of Hamburg he spent two years as a research assistant at the Institute of Social Sciences, Center for Legal Researches in Belgrade. During his studies Mr. Perovic gained an extensive non-formal education and practice in the fields closely related to human rights and humanitarian law through participation in numerous number of prestigous non-degree schools and voluntary work in various human rights and humanitarian non-governmental organizations (Regional Academy on the United Nations; University of Groningen- Summer School on Transitional Justice and Politics of Memory; International School for Holocaust; Duke University- International Human Rights Law: Prospects and Challenges etc.). His academic interests and research areas extend to human rights and international humanitarian law as well as fields such as discrimination, nationalism, transitional justice.
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Ana Paula Pires is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Institute for Contemporary History (IHC) at Universidade Nova de Lisboa. In 2013, with colleagues from Yale, New York University, and King’s College, she founded the International Network for the Study of the Great War in Africa, which has been regularly organizing conferences. Her current research focuses on moments and processes of cultural encounters in the Indian Ocean during the  First World War, exploring imperial contexts and transnational connections. In 2014, she established at the IHC the research line “Modern War: global challenges and local impacts. Pires is section editor in the joint research project 1914-1918-online, led by Freie Universitat (Berlin), spanning more than 50 countries.
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website: http://ihc.fcsh.unl.pt/pt/ihc/investigadores/item/1087-appires


Roshan Pokharel received a Masters of Laws (LL.M) from Pune University. He is serving as faculty member of Law in Department of Conflict Peace and Development Studies, Tribhuvan University and adjunct faculty of MSW at Center for Nepal and Asian studies (CNAS). He also serves as Member Secretary of Lawyers Academy Syllabus review Committee, Transitional Justice Law Committee, and Lawyers Academy Committee at Nepal Bar Association.
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Dana Radler recently completed her PhD at the University of Bucharest with a monography on “Memory and Fiction in John McGahern's Works", following an MA in International Relations at the Faculty of Political Science in 2004. She currently teaches at the Bucharest University of Economic Studies. Her current interests combine global issues, memory, and Irish studies, with a particular focus on identity, cultural theories, and gender as constructs or de-constructs of modern societies.
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Filipa Raimundo is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon and a Guest Assistant Professor at ISCTE-IUL in Lisbon.She holds a PhD in Political and Social Sciences from the European University Institute in Florence. Previously, she was a Postdoctoral Fellow and Guest Lecturer at the University of Utrecht. She has been a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley, the University of São Paulo, and the Juan March Institute in Madrid. Her interests include: democratization, transitional justice, authoritarian legacies, and the quality of democracy in Europe. Her work has been published by Democratization, Palgrave/Macmillan and Columbia University Press, among others.​ She is a member of the ECPR Standing Group on Human Rights and Transitional Justice and of the Alliance for Historical Dialogue and Accountability based at Columbia University. 
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website: http://www.ics.ul.pt/instituto/?ln=e&pid=236&mm=2&ctmid=3&mnid=1&doc=31816889833

Sabrina de Regt is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and member of the interuniversity Center for Social Science Theory and Methodology (ICS). Her research interests include democratic values, national commemorations, cohesion and cross-national research. She has previously worked as a postdoc researcher on the project ‘Freedom and Liberation Day in the Netherlands’ in collaboration with the National Committee for 4 and 5 May and as a fieldwork coordinator for the large-scale Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement (SHARE). Having earned Master degrees in Sociology (2006, Tilburg University) and Quantitative Analysis in Social Science (magna cum laude, 2009, Catholic University of Brussels), she obtained her PhD from the University of Antwerp in 2012. The PhD was funded by a grant she had applied for herself.
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Richard Reiman received his Ph.D. in 1984 in History from the University of Cincinnati (USA). He has published articles and a book, The New Deal and American Youth (1992), on topics related to the field of twentieth century U.S. In 2007-2008, he taught as a senior Fulbright scholar at the Martin-Luther Universitat in Halle (Saale), Germany, teaching courses in memory politics and construction in modern U.S. History. Currently he is researching the subject of trauma versus defeat among two "victim" groups of Americans remembering (and constituting two collective memories of) the Kennedy assassination, and how that has created two reciprocating and interacting tracks in the memory of the assassination.
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Francesco Ricatti is Cassamarca Senior Lecturer in History and Italian Studies at the University of the Sunshine Coast, where he is also the Program Coordinator for the Bachelor of Arts. His research interests are in migration history, political history, the history of emotions, football history, historiography, and creative approaches to history and public memory. He is the author of Embodying Migrants: Italians in Postwar Australia (2011) and co-editor of Politica ed emozioni nella storia d’Italia dal 1848 ad oggi (2012). In 2013 he co-edited a special issue of Cultural Studies Review on emotional geographies of the uncanny. His current research focuses on emotional geographies, resilience in challenging rural environments, the intersections between migration and colonialism, and migrants’ attitudes towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. 
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Esther Romeyn's latest research project focuses on anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, particularly in the Netherlands. She examines the ways in which the Holocaust and Holocaust memorialization is embedded in a civilizational discourse that is linked to the institutionalization of tolerance as a European norm and form of governmentality. This involves the erasure of the post colonial condition, involves a truncated understanding of racism, and legitimates the differentialization of populations. 
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Ela Rossmiller is an advanced doctoral candidate and adjunct instructor at American University's School of International Studies. She is also a visiting scholar at the University of Warsaw's Social Memory Laboratory. Her main research interest is the construction of official public memory following political violence and political transformations. Other research interests include conflict resolution, historical justice, and apology diplomacy. 
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Cathrin Ruppe was educated at the University of Münster, Liverpool John Moores University and the Université de Haute-Bretagne II, resulting in two Master degrees in Modern History, Cultural Studies, and Irish Studies. Her main fields of research are social and cultural history, focusing predominantly on memory and identity issues regarding political violence, terrorism and intrastate conflicts. She is a lecturer at the University of Applied Sciences Münster.
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website: www.cathrinruppe.com 

Paolo Ruspini (MA Pol. Sci., PhD, Milan) is senior researcher at the University of Lugano (USI), Switzerland. A political scientist, he has been studying international and European migration and integration since 1997 with a comparative approach based upon qualitative and policy analyses. His current research deals with transnational migration in Europe from a theoretical and empirical perspective. Since 2012 he is also the Swiss member of the Management Committee of the COST Action “In Search of Transcultural Memory in Europe” (ISTME).
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website: http://usi.to/h9w

Mihai Stelian Rusu is a postdoctoral research fellow at Babeș-Bolyai University (Cluj-Napoca, Romania). He received his PhD in Sociology from the same university in 2013, with a thesis on the cultural genesis and the structural transformation of Romanian historical memory recently published as a book with the title Romanian National Memory. The Discursive Making and Re-Makings of the National Past (2015, in Romanian). He studies the politics of memory and commemoration as well as the political sociology of nationalism.
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website: researchgate.net/profile/Mihai_RUSU


Eric Sangar is a research associate at the Department of European & International Studies at King’s College London, and employed in the European collaborative project INFOCORE. He received a doctoral degree in Social and Political Sciences from the European University Institute in Florence, and an MA degree in International Affairs from Sciences Po Paris. In his PhD project, he explored the uses of historical experience by contemporary military organizations through interviews, discourse analysis, and document analysis. The book version of his thesis was published in 2014 with the title Historical Experience: Burden or Bonus in Today’s Wars? As of October 2015, he will be a research fellow at the Belgian FNRS based at the University of Namur, where he will conduct a study on the impact of collective memory on the uses of history in conflict-related discourse. His research interests include the impact of collective memory on contemporary perceptions and strategies in international relations, the combination of qualitative and quantitative tools to observe the dynamics of collective memory, the military and political uses of history, and the links between the diffusion of collective memory and the formation of new collective identities.
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websites: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/europeanstudies/people/staff/associated/sangare.aspx ; 
https://www.linkedin.com/pub/eric-sangar/22/4b7/70b

Alexandros Sianos completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Athens in 2012, obtaining a degree in History and Archaeology. As the end result of a research seminar on the Second World War and its "remembrance"/narration he wrote a paper on Switzerland and its alleged neutrality under the guidance of Professor Hagen Fleischer. After a brief period working as a consultant, Sianos decided to return to his studies by pursuing an MA Title. He enlisted at an RMA Programme at the University of Utrecht in 2013. There, he participated in seminars with various themes, but his main focus remained Memory and History. Sianos wrote his master thesis, "Divided Memories for a United Europe? The European Capitals of Culture and the Search for European Unity", based on the theoretical and factual knowledge he acquired during his undergraduate and graduate studies. In his thesis, Sianos reviewed the various stages of WWII "remembrance" in Western and Eastern Europe. Based on a distinction between "reflective" and "traditional/nationalistic" historical narratives he demonstrated how four European Capitals of Culture (Weimar, Linz, Vilnius and Sibiu) presented their post-war history during their "tenure" as European Capitals of Culture. His research showed that cities belonging to a Western European state (even Weimar who was part of the GDR) were more "reflective" towards their history and included narratives of both collaboration and resistance whereas the cities that belonged to Eastern European states were more reluctant to do so and focused mainly on their own victimization by the Soviet Union.
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Marco Siddi received his PhD at the University of Edinburgh with a dissertation focusing on the relationship between national identity, collective memory and foreign policy in Germany, Poland and Finland. He is currently Senior Research Fellow at the Finnish Institute of International Affairs, where he focuses inter alia on Russian and European memory politics, particularly in the context of Second World War commemorations. 
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website: http://www.sps.ed.ac.uk/gradschool/our_students/research_student_profiles/politics_and_ir/marco_siddi

Aline Sierp is Assistant Professor in European Studies at Maastricht University and is one of the two chairs of the CES Research Network on Transnational Memory and Identity in Europe. Her research interests cover collective memory, questions of identity and European integration. Before joining the University of Maastricht, Aline Sierp worked as researcher at the Dachau Concentration Camp Memorial Site. She is the author of History, Memory and Transeuropean Identity: Unifying Divisions (Routledge, 2014) and member of the COST network ‘In Search of Transcultural Memory in Europe’ and the ‘Historical Dialogues, Justice, and Memory Network’. 
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website: http://www.maastrichtuniversity.nl/web/Profile/aline.sierp.htm

Ivor Sokolić is a PhD student at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College London. Prior to this, he completed a BSc and an MSc in European Politics from the University of Aberystwyth. His main research focus is on the process of transitional justice in Croatia (through mechanisms such as the ICTY, domestic war crimes trials and civil society efforts). His doctoral work analyzes how the process has influenced norms in the country.
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website: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ssees/people/politics-and-sociology-research-students-folder/ivor-sokolic


Anette Homlong Storeide is Associate Professor of European Studies at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway. Her research interests include modern European history, transnational memories of WWII, and history politics. She has published extensively on Norwegian and European narratives of the Second World War, eg. Norske krigsprofitører (Norwegian War Profiteers: Nazi-Germany’s Willing Supporters)( Oslo 2014), Arven etter Hitler: Tysklands oppgjør med naziregimet (The Shadow of Hitler. Germanys debates on its Nazi Past) (Oslo 2010), Das Schreiben über die KZ-Gefangenschaft (Writing about Nazi-Imprisonment) (Oslo 2007), Tidsvitner – fortellinger fra Auschwitz og Sachsenhausen (Witnesses, Survivors of Auschwitz and Sachsenhausen) (ed. with Jakob Lothe) (Oslo 2006).
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website: https://www.ntnu.no/ansatte/anette.homlong.storeide


Meghan Tinsley is a PhD candidate in Sociology at Boston University. Her research concerns representations of Muslims in British and French First World War commemorations. More broadly, she is interested in the construction and contestation of national memory in postcolonial societies. 
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website: http://www.bu.edu/sociology/graduate-programs/current-students/meghan-tinsley/

Kelsey Utne is a PhD student in the department of history at Cornell University, where she is interested in public history and memorialization in late colonial to early postcolonial South Asia. Prior to coming to Cornell, she completed her MA in South Asia Studies at the University of Washington and spent eight months in New Delhi through a Fulbright student scholarship.
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Joyce van de Bildt is a Ph.D. candidate in History at Tel Aviv University, Israel, writing her dissertation about the contested memory of the 1952 revolution in Egypt during the periods of rule of Anwar al-Sadat and Hosni Mubarak. Her research interests include contemporary Egyptian history and politics, collective memory, commemoration and identity politics. She has participated in the Mnemonics Network for Memory Studies.
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website: http://www.dayan.org/joyce-van-de-bildt

Eric Wiebelhaus-Brahm, Ph.D. University of Colorado at Boulder, is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. Research interests include human rights, post-conflict reconstruction, and democratization, particularly the evaluation of transitional justice mechanisms. Publications include Truth Commissions and Transitional Societies (Routledge, 2010), and several book chapters and articles in journals such as the International Journal of Transitional Justice andJournal of Human Rights. Volunteered with Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Diaspora Project.
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website: https://sites.google.com/site/ericwiebelhausbrahm/home


Daphne Winland, PhD  is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at York University in Toronto Canada. Her research and publications reflect broadly focused interests in (trans)nationalism, diaspora, the politics of memory and the cultural politics of representation. Since the war in the former Yugoslavia began in 1990, she has been investigating Croatians’ struggles, both in diaspora and the newly independent homeland, to reimagine/reinvent themselves in the changing political, social and cultural landscape of post-communist Europe. Her current research, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada,  “Beyond Remittances: Croatian "expert expatriates" and the impacts of post-socialist strategies of diaspora enticement”, focuses on recent efforts to harness diaspora Croat patriotism, nostalgia and, most importantly, investment in a climate of ‘liberalized’ economic development and an increasingly ethnicized, transnationally focused citizenship regime.
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website: http://www.yorku.ca/laps/anth/faculty/winland/Winland3.html

Mark A. Wolfgram (Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison 2001) has received fellowships from Carleton University, the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation, the Joan Shorenstein Center at Harvard University, the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) and the Friedrich-Ebert Foundation. "Getting History Right": East and West German Collective Memories of the Holocaust and War was published by Bucknell University Press in 2011. His current research project is a comparison of collective memory formation in Germany, Japan, Spain, Yugoslavia and Turkey. He is affiliated with the Alliance for Historical Dialogue and Accountability.
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Jenny Wüstenberg is (as of January 2016) Visiting Assistant Professor in Political Science and German and European Studies at York University in Toronto. She is a founding Co-Chair of the Research Network on Transnational Memory and Identity in Europe. Her research examines civil society activism, transnational networks, and methodology in memory politics. She is the author of Moving Memory: Civil Society and Remembrance in Postwar Germany (forthcoming, Cambridge University Press). Jenny is a member of the “German Studies Association Memory Studies Network” and the “Historical Dialogues, Justice, and Memory Network.”
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website: http://jennywuestenberg.weebly.com/






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